Welcome, Guest
Do you need customer support or technical assistance? Click here to submit a support ticket...

TOPIC: Re:Post Mortem

Re:Post Mortem 5 years 5 months ago #2100

  • Tarek Al-Fahham
  • Tarek Al-Fahham's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 71
  • Karma: 3
Hi Cornelius,

This is the kind of question which we are very confused about. Appreciate if you could provide your answer and clarification:

Post-mortem analysis after scheduled finish date of a project shows a CPI of 0.8 and an SPI of 1.25. What is a plausible explanation for that?

a) The project was terminated early. At that time, it was over budget and ahead of schedule.

b) The project has produced additional deliverables which were originally not required.

c) The project has evidently been finished under budget and behind of schedule.

d) The project has evidently been finished over budget and ahead of schedule.

Tarek.

Re:Post Mortem 5 years 5 months ago #2101

  • Cornelius Fichtner
  • Cornelius Fichtner's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • PrepCast Instructor
  • Posts: 981
  • Thank you received: 157
  • Karma: 30
Tarek,

This question is trying to "trick" you by giving you additional and quite confusing information in the answers. All you have to do is focus on the facts.

First:
CPI of 0.8 means: project is over budget (bad!)
SPI of 1.25 means: project is ahead of schedule (good!)

If you compare this to the available answers, you will see that both answers A or D give you these options. But the question clearly says "Post-mortem analysis AFTER scheduled finish date...". To me, this means that the project was NOT terminated early (answer A).

Therefore, based on this analysis, Answer D) is correct.

Also: When posting a question in our forums, please always quote the source of the question and clearly state where this question comes from. Thank you.
Until Next Time,
Cornelius Fichtner, PMP, CSM
President, OSP International LLC

Re:Post Mortem 5 years 5 months ago #2113

  • Tarek Al-Fahham
  • Tarek Al-Fahham's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 71
  • Karma: 3
Many thanks Cornelius ....! You made my day. So this means "Post-mortem" does not necessarily mean the project is terminated early as I originally thought!!

Could you please tell me if there is anything from the question, in the provided EVM Values or other parameters which will indicate if the project is "Terminated Early". I think the wording only will tell you if the project is terminated early.

Tarek.

Re:Post Mortem 5 years 5 months ago #2116

  • Cornelius Fichtner
  • Cornelius Fichtner's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • PrepCast Instructor
  • Posts: 981
  • Thank you received: 157
  • Karma: 30
Tarek,

Yes, there is no way to tell from mere EVM numbers, if a project was terminated early. The numbers may indicate a very badly performing project, but just from the numbers alone there is no way to tell if it was an early termination or if it's still ongoing.
Until Next Time,
Cornelius Fichtner, PMP, CSM
President, OSP International LLC

Re:Post Mortem 5 years 4 months ago #2313

  • Anjali Riat
  • Anjali Riat's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Junior Boarder
  • Posts: 21
  • Karma: 0
Hi,

My analysis of this question was -

(a) and (c) are not correct because of simple analysis of the question.

Between (b) and (d) I would have selected (b) as the correct answer.

The reason is -
SPI = EV/PV

EV is the value of the product 'earned' at an point in time
PV is the value of the product 'planned' at that point in time.

At the end of the project, if we complete ONLY the work defined in the WBS, the EV should be equal to the PV. After all, the value of the work we completed is the same as the value of the work we had planned to do.

So at the end of the project, if there is a variance between EV and PV, it would mean that we did either less or more work than was required.

In this case, that would be answer (b).

Please let me know if this makes any sense.

Regards,
Anjali

Re:Post Mortem 5 years 3 months ago #2377

  • Amit Jain
  • Amit Jain's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 13
  • Karma: 0
Anjali,
First of all, congratulations of being a fresh PMP. I'm in the process...

Good twist to EV/PV with respect to 'end of project'.... BUT..the way I see it...

If the project is to paint 12 walls in 12 days, and if you complete the project in 10 days.... and the end of project--
earned value - 12 walls
planned value - 10 walls (after 10 days !!! project over in 10 days, not 12)

so SPI = 12/10 = 1.2

Re:Post Mortem 5 months 2 weeks ago #7620

  • Nathan Carter
  • Nathan Carter's Avatar
Just in response to your answer about the Post Mortem question. I answered D as it stated it was after the scheduled finish date. However when I check the answers below the question it states that the answer is A. Very confused!

Re:Post Mortem 3 months 3 weeks ago #8037

  • RAMI HAIDAR
  • RAMI HAIDAR's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
Mr. Fichtner, can you explain again please why answer A was correct and it seems project has been terminated?
Thanks.

Re:Post Mortem 3 months 2 weeks ago #8101

  • Stettin Palver
  • Stettin Palver's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: 0
I have seen this question in a few different places, worded differently, and the answer seems to be that if SV is less than 1.0 in the end the project was cancelled. I guess it could be possible to end the project with a positive schedule variance if the baseline was not updated and there was some unexpected increases in productivity that put the project ahead of schedule.

However I found a link to a post with a reference saying that a properly managed project should end with a SV of 1.0.

SV discussion
Moderators: Yolanda Mabutas, Ahmed Amin, Scott Gillard, Michael DeCicco, Rahul Kakkar, Fernando Jr Sinlao Lim, Mary Kathrine Padua, Chris Preziotti, Lazard Toe, ITBMC, MPM, CIPM, PMP, ITIL, Christian Winter, Kevin Nason, Michael Sumaquial, PMP, Mark Wuenscher, PMP

OSP INTERNATIONAL LLC
OSP INTERNATIONAL LLC
Training for Project Management Professional (PMP)®, PMI Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP)®, and Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)®